Everett Maroon has served as the Executive Director of an HIV/AIDS nonprofit in Walla Walla since December 2010; previously he worked as an IT lead for the Social Security Administration in Woodlawn, MD, and at ORC Macro as a program manager in Bethesda, MD. He was honored as Employee of the Year at ORC Macro in 2002. Everett has worked on software, data quality, and program support projects for the National Science Foundation, Health and Human Services, Department of Education, the Census, the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Health Resources and Services Administration.

In Walla Walla, Everett has increased the funding support for his agency from less than $190,000 a year to $500,000, and increased its service area into the Tri-Cities, Yakima, and Clarkston. He serves as the project co-chair for the Greater Columbia Accountable Community of Health’s (GCACH) Opioid Demonstration Project, helping oversee the region’s comprehensive strategy to combat the opioid crisis and support opioid-dependent individuals into recovery and improved health. Everett’s other commitments and professional experience includes:

  • GCACH Practice Transformation Workgroup member
  • GCACH Leadership Council member
  • 2016 White House Convening on Opioids, attendee
  • Walla Walla County Department of Community Health, Finance Committee member
  • Walla Walla County Department of Community Health Advisory Board member
  • Walla Walla Noon Rotary member
  • Washington State Democratic Party State Committeemember (16th LD)
  • Precinct Committee Officer
  • STAR Project Board of Directors, 2014-2017

Everett’s current work at his agency includes supporting the medical and non-medical needs of vulnerable people living with HIV/AIDS in Walla Walla, Columbia, Garfield, and Asotin counties, in a variety of HIV/AIDS prevention programs including testing, outreach, and syringe exchange, and in emerging programs to combat the opioid crisis in our region. He is the Principal Investigator for Eastern Washington on a federal contract, managed by the University of Washington to provide laypeople and first responders with naloxone, an opioid overdose reversal agent, and work to improve the strength of resources in his service area. In the last three years, this naloxone program has reversed more than 130 overdoses.

These professional experiences reveal that Everett is willing to pursue evidence-based solutions where they lead, even when they may be politically controversial. He is also open to changing approaches if outcomes are not met or the evidence shows tactics should shift. He is the right person to work on improving healthcare for all of Washington, including Southeast Washington.